History
24. 12. 2019
Živorad Jovanović

Never to forget:
1999-2019 Belgrade declaration

On the occasion of the 20 th anniversary of the aggression of NATO
Alliance against Serbia (the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, the FRY),
on 22 nd and 23 rd March, 2019 Belgrade was the venue of the International
Conference under slogan NEVER TO FORGET, and title “Peace and
Progress instead of Wars and Poverty”. The organisers of the Con-
ference are the Belgrade Forum for the World of Equals, the Federation
of Associations of Veterans of the National Liberation War of Serbia,
the Serbian Generals and Admirals Club, the Society of the Serbian
Hosts, in cooperation with the World Peace Council. Besides the par-
ticipants from Serbia, the Conference was attended by more than 200
distinguished guests from some 35 countries from all over the world,
whom the organisers welcomed and expressed sincerest gratitude for
their solidarity, support and huge humanitarian relief during one of
the most challenging periods in the recent history of Serbia and the
Serbian nation.
The program of activities marking this anniversary was dedicated
to preserving the lasting memory and paying tribute to the military
and the police personnel who made the ultimate sacrifice in the de-
fence of their country against the aggression, as well as to the civilian
victims including the very young, the very old, and the ailing victims
killed during this 78-day aggression by NATO.
The participants have unanimously condemned NATO aggression,
affirming that in its essence it was an illegal, invading and criminal
war against a peaceful sovereign European country, waged without the
UN Security Council mandate and under brute violation of the United
Nations Charter, the OSCE Helsinki Final (1975) and the basic princi-
ples of international law.
By attacking Serbia (the FRY), the leading Western powers cham-
pioned by the USA had exposed the freedom-loving and justness-ori-
ented Serbian people to anguish, devastation, and lasting suffering for
the sake of attaining their imperialistic geopolitical aims for control
of natural and energy resources, the road of transport and the sphere
of influence. This was neither ‘a small war’ nor ‘a humanitarian inter-
vention’, but rather a war of underlying geopolitical goals for the long-
term deployment of the US troops in the Balkans, for the establish-
ment of case precedent for future aggressions, and for the toppling of
legitimate governments, all within the Eastbound Expansion Strategy
and the overall goal of setting the global dominance. The history will
note the fact that, back in 1999, blindly following alien geopolitical in-
terests, Europe fought itself.
The Balkan is today more unstable. Europe is even more divided.
Europe’s backtracking to itself requires some soul-searching, courage
and the vision, including confession that the attack against Serbia (the
FRY) in 1999 was a colossal historical error.
The aggression’s masterminds and executors should be held re-
sponsible for their crimes. The aggression killed some 4,000 persons
(including 79 children), whereas additional 6,500 people were seriously
wounded. Direct material damage amounted to US 100 billion. It was
stressed that NATO and its members participating in the aggression
had duty to compensate the war damages to Serbia.
The participants of the Conference were informed about the find-
ings of scientific and expert analyses conducted so far, all confirming
that the use of ammunition filled with depleted uranium, and of
graphite and cluster bombs and other inflammable and toxic means
of warfare, have resulted in high levels of the long-term environmental
pollution and the massive-scale endangering of the Serbian citizens.
They welcomed the establishment of special bodies of both the nation-
al Assembly and of the Government of Serbia tasked with determin-
ing the consequences of NATO aggression reflected on the health of
population and the safety of environment and expressed support to
the work of those bodies.
The forcible and unlawful tearing Kosovo and Metohija off Serbia
continues, through the constant pressuring of Serbia to formally ac-
knowledge the splitting off of a part of territory of its State. Partici-
pants of the Conference underscored that a forcible taking of Kosovo
and Metohija apart from Serbia would become a precedent which, in
turn, would inevitably pave the way for drawing the new borders in
the Balkans and the creation of the so-called Greater Albania at the
expense of territories of the states of Serbia, North Macedonia, Greece,
and Montenegro, what must not be permitted.
NATO aggression against Serbia (the FRY) was a direct and simul-
taneous attack on the peace and security system in Europe and in
the world, which has been constructed on the outcome of the Second
World War. As conclusively demonstrated by the subsequent interven-
tions of the USA and its allies (Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Mali, Syria,
etc.), this aggression has served as case-precedent and template to
globalize the interventionism, a manual on how to utilize terrorism
and separatism to carry out the Western powers’ plans of conquest, in
order to forcibly topple ‘unsuitable’ regimes and impose geopolitical
interests of the West, notably, of the USA.
NATO aggression against Serbia (the FRY), an act of most blatant
violation of fundamental principles of the international law, is unjusti-
fiable; aggressor’s responsibility cannot be diminished by hypocritical
attempts to transfer responsibility onto Serbia or her that – time state
leadership. This NATO aggression made history as an indicator of
moral and civilisation decline that, twenty years on, the governments
of the leading aggressor countries have neither been pardoned, nor
gotten to learn the right lesson from.

History
24. 12. 2019
Bozhidar Trifunov Mitrovich

Two Civilizations in Europe

With this text, I will disappoint many people, and above all, those
ones who hope that only by entering the European Union they will
become the part of civilized Europe. I will disappoint those poets who
are engaged in geopolitics, and those who accept the poetic expression
“Serbia is East in the West and West in the East” as the basis of the con-
cept of Serbian politics. They attributed this poetic term to Saint Sava
of Serbia. Although no one has found such a statement in the writings
of St. Sava, it is rooted, although being inaccurate.
In Europe, there are two civilizations for several thousand years,
and even today. A new, second civilization in these lands began to be
established after the fall of Troy in Asia Minor and spread from 509,
more precisely from 510 BC. 1) , with the so-called Roman Revolution.
Namely, with the fall of Troy, and with the so-called Roman Revolu-
tion of 509/510 BC., the military-commercial oligarchy has replaced a
tribal civilization and agricultural culture, because truly revolutionary
changes have occurred. Until 509 BC a person’s belonging to society
was determined through the race. After the so-called Roman Revolu-
tion of 509 BC, “Boundary” – the border – becomes one of the highest
values of that new civilization and an essential feature of the city of
Rome, later the Roman Empire, and the status of a person has since
been established through the territory, which is why today the state is
perceived as a monopoly of physical coercion on specific territory.
Because of this, in all Western languages, the word „state“ comes
from the Latin word “status” (position, affiliation): English: state,
German: der Staat, French: Etat, Danish: stat, Spanish. Estado, Italian:
stato, Dutch: staat, Portuguese. Estado. Since the “boundary” – the
border has become the highest value in Rome, which is included in
the sacred axiom more than fratricide, or vice versa, it is the basis of
constant fratricides. Territory has become the main criterion for de-
termining belonging to the whole, that is, the highest value – civesu,
as a “ bounded citadel”, the fenced area of Rome, which is the essence
of the military oligarchy (formed by the reforms of the Etruscan king
Servius Thulius), constantly expanding, subjugating more and more
and new territories. But this innovation of 509/510 BC was designed
in the past and connected with 754 BC, when, as reported in the epic
“Aeneid / vAeneid”, and fratricide occurred when Romulus killed his
brother Rem, precisely because of the boundary – border.
With the very mentioning the ancient past, which we call history,
my point of view of the past will be unacceptable to the editors of many
publications, as denial of dogma, because you enter a restricted area
or a hunting ground managed by historians and partly archaeologists,
and there every opportunity for various views is suppressed, because,
in their opinion, there is a generally accepted point of view (in fact, a
dogma) that no one can touch, although this contradicts science and
denies the possibility of new scientific discoveries because new scien-
tific discoveries are the condition for the existence of science.
The “Official History” presents the development of human society
in the blackest genocide image, where whole nations are constantly
disappearing and new nations are constantly appearing. The Serbian
people and the Serbian language are part of this monstrous genocidal
projection. Projections in which, even at the beginning of the 21 st cen-
tury, many new peoples emerge from the Serbian people, which threat-
ens the Serbs as a people that completely disappears. This is possible
because no one, and especially politicians and journalists, are going to
notice the characteristic that the Serbian people carry as the bearer of
this ancient civilization in Europe.
It is noteworthy that Europe long ago adopted the Roman princi-
ple proclaimed by the Roman Senate: “All inhabitants in the territory
of the Roman Empire are Romans”, which is still valid in all Western
countries: “All inhabitants in Italy are Italian”; “All residents in France
are French.”
The United States of America adopted many characteristics and even
the names of the Roman Empire: the Senate, the Capitol, the concept
of the state as a military oligarchy, because they do not have all the at-
tributes of the state, because their state does not even print money. In
this Roman spirit, they adopted the Roman principle: “All residents in the
United States are Americans.” Since their stories are just over two hundred
years old, they coined the term “melting pot / melting pot of nations”.
But in Serbia, this Roman principle of civesa or civil society simply
is not applied. And the largest supporters of civil society in no way
would have thought that the Roman territorial concept could be ap-
plied to them and established by the Constitution of Serbia, that they
are Serbians, as “all residents in France are French”, “all residents in
the United States are Americans, “and accordingly,” all the inhabitants
of Serbia are Serbians” or“ all the inhabitants of Serbia are Serbs.” Al-
though I myself am a Serb, I say: thank God that this is not so, because
everyone needs to respect his origin.
The answer to why this is so and why the principle “all inhabitants
in the territory of Serbia are Serbians / Serbs” is not applied in Serbia is
hidden in the theory of state and law.
Precisely because in Europe there are still two civilizations:
• civilization of the clan (SloVen / rAsSena / Russian), which is
the oldest in Europe, which we today call Russia (whose source is
in Lepensky Vir and Vinca culture / The Vinča culture, [vî:ntʃa] 2),
in the vast of which 192 clans were preserved due to the fact that
the principle “One Territory – One Nation” is not applied in Russia
and Serbian countries in the Balkans, since, thank God, “not all the
inhabitants of Russia are Russians,” and “not all the inhabitants of
Serbia are Serbians / Serbs,” which is a civilizational value and of
great importance for the whole world as it is a way to prevent terri-
tory total conflict and ethnic persecution;
• territorial civilization (the one of Rome, the Roman Empire,
which originated in 509 BC), so the Roman Senate after several
centuries proclaimed the principle: “All inhabitants of the territory
of the Roman Empire are Romans,” this principle is relevant today
in all Western countries: “All the inhabitants in Italy are Italians”,
“All residents in France are French”, “All residents in the USA are
Americans”.

This issue is the most problematic for sports journalists, who do not
even understand that when they report, for example, on the finals of
the World Water Polo Championship, they commit criminal acts, the
“genocide” of the Serbian people, because they do not say that Serbians
and Montenegrins met. They already report boldly and enthusiastic-
ally that the gigantic Serbs and the gigantic Montenegrins met, despite
the fact that they thereby separate the Serbs from Montenegro from
the Serbs from Serbia, or more precisely, with the whole (non) sports
gesture / expression, the entire Serbian people are destroyed (crossed
out) in Montenegro what did not come to mind, or rather, what even
the Nazis and Italian fascists failed to achieve. But sports journalists
are not to blame more than scientists who are not going to read new
scientific discoveries, and especially those scientists who believe that
history is a distant, long-ended past.
However, this is not so: “history is not a distant, finished long ago
past.” Law, in a way, is the “shadow” of social relations, which are the
material source of law. But it turned out that the “shadow” (law) has
not changed, although the so-called socio-economic formations have
changed (which try to impose some ideologies not like the “cabinet”
models, but like reality). Therefore, right today we are told not only “what
took place once”. Namely, today in Europe there are two civilizations, as
territorial civilization originated in the days of the Roman Empire.
Due to the fact that in a territorially conceived organization of soci-
ety, law is prescribed by the legislative body, in science law is mistaken-
ly associated exclusively with the existence of the state.
Rome expanded territorially, but outside the territory of the Roman
Empire, the dominant principle remained that the gens represents the
basis for determining membership in the whole, and the family, family
artel, clan, fraternity, tribe and tribal union with the Elective veche,
as a form of decision-making at fraternal meetings, remained to be the
sources of gender rights (gens – Rod, whence: ius GENtium / gender law).
And that is precisely why Serbia and the Serbian people are not
“East in the West and West in the East.” They are the part of the civiliz-
ation of Races or RasSenskaia civilization, which today we call Russia.
And that is precisely why there is a constant need for the West to invent
new names of peoples in the Balkans and to suppress the Serbs in the
cruel and constant “Breakthrough of the West to the East” (“Drang
nach Osten”).
_________________________
1) Depending on what date to start calculating the New Year
2) dubbed Vinca archaeological excavation, near Belgrade, Serbia: Vincha /
The Vinča culture, [vî:ntʃa] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vinča_culture

Story about the Artist
24. 12. 2019
Mirjana Đošić

Biography

Address: Vidikovački venac 77/106, Rakovica, Beograd
Telephone: 064/ 29 585 23, 011/ 2340-563
Mail: mirjanadjosic@yahoo.com

Mirjana Đošić was born on January 31st, 1981 in Trstenik. She gradu-
ated from the Faculty of Art in Belgrade in 2005 at the department of
painting in class of prof. Andjelka Bojovic. She enrolled PHD studies
at the same professor in 2009. She received her PhD in 2015. She has
been a member of ULUS (The Association of Fine Artists of Serbia)
since 2006. Mirjana has a status of independent artist since 2009.
2012 She won the first prize for outstanding contribution to the
contemporary Serbian art, regarding the Review exhibition of Serb-
ian painters held in Art Pavilion “Cvjeta Zuzoric” in Belgrade

Solo exibitons:
2018 House of King Peter I, Belgrade
2015 Gallery of the Belgrade City Library, Belgrade
2015 Gallery of Fine Arts, Belgrade
2013 Gallery “Progres”, Belgrade
2012 Gallery 55 Niš, Niš
2012 Cultural Center of Novi Sad, Novi Sad
2011 Gallery of Institute for studying cultural development, Belgrade
2011 Gallery, House of Vojinovic, Indjija
2011 Danubian art show-window, “ Danube assurance” a.d.o. , Belgrade
2011 Gallery of Institute for studying cultural development, Belgrade
2010 Art Gallery of the Cultural Center Čačak, Čačak
2010 Gallery “Qucerra“, Rakovica, Belgrade
2010 Gallery „Block“, Belgrade
2010 Gallery of Home Culture Trstenik, Trstenik
2010 Gallery „Balkan Bridges“, Kragujevac
2009 Gallery of Institute for studying cultural development, Belgrade
2008 Gallery of “Ilija M. Kolarac”, Belgrade
2005 Solo exhibition, club-house “Painting”, Belgrade

Important exhibitions:
2019 The “Spring exhibition”, the gallery of „Cvjeta Zuzoric“ in Belgrade
2017 Salon in October, the gallery of „Cvjeta Zuzoric“ in Belgrade
2017 The “Spring exhibition”, the gallery of „Cvjeta Zuzoric“ in Belgrade
2017 The Choice, Galerija ULUS, Beograd
2016 The “Spring exhibition”, the gallery of „Cvjeta Zuzoric“ in Belgrade
2012 The review exhibition of Serbian painters held in the art
pavilion “Cvjeta Zuzoric” in Belgrade
2012 The first Belgrade art colony of the Pero Gallery, Gallery of the
Municipality Vracar, Belgrade
2012 “The exhibition of the young”, “Nis Art Foundation”, Nis,
Novi Sad and Belgrade
2012 The third international biennial exhibition of small format,
the gallery of the “Gabor Sarvas” library, Ada
2012 The third international biennial exhibition of small format
gallery, the gallery of the Open university, Subotica
2012 The spring exhibition, the gallery of “Cvjeta Zuzoric” in Belgrade
2011 Group exhibition of drawings, Gallery of High school
“Mladost”, Petrovac na Mlavi
2010 Group exhibition of drawings FESTUM, Student Cultural
Center, Belgrade
2010 The “Spring exhibition” in the gallery of “Cvijeta Zuzoric”, Belgrade
2010 Group exhibition of drawings, Gallery of high school
“Mladost”, Petrovac na Mlavi
2009 The “Spring exhibition” in the gallery of “Cvijeta Zuzoric”, Belgrade
2009 Group exhibition in the “Fenix” gallery, Belgrade
2009 October exhibition, National Musem, Krusevac
2008 Group exhibition of drawings in the campaign called
“Use your personality to fight the violence” and the program
entitled “The murals” in the exhibition hall of “Citroen” 2008
Group exhibition of drawings in the campaign called “Use
your personality to fight the violence” and the program entitled
“The murals”, Gallery of Graphic collective, Belgrade
2008 The “Spring exhibition” in the gallery of “Cvijeta Zuzoric”,
Belgrade
2008 Group exhibition of drawings in the campaign called “Use
your personality to fight the violence“, Belgrade windows,
Belgrade
2008 Annual exibition, Gallery of “Ilija M. Kolarac”, Belgrade
2007 Exhibition in honor of greek-serbian friendship, Belgrade
2007 Group exhibition of collage and ensemble in the Small gallery
of ULUPUDS as well as in the house-gallery of Djura Jakšic
2006 Exhibition in honour of the new members of “ULUS” in
“Cvijeta Zuzoric” gallery in Belgrade
2006 Group exhibition of paintings, Cultural center, Babusnica
2006 “Yu paleta mladih”, exhibition in Vrbas
2006 The“Autumn exhibition” in “Cvijeta Zuzoric” gallery in Belgrade
2006 Group exhibition in the SO Palilula, Belgrade
2005 Exhibition of drawings (prof. Andjelka Bojovic’s class) in the
gallery of the Faculty of Arts (Knez Mihajlova 6)
2005 34th Annual Exhibition of Small Format Art for students of Art
Faculty in the Youth center in Belgrade
2005 Exhibition of the 5th grade students in the Military exhibit hall
in Belgrade
2005 Group exhibition in the “SULUJ” gallery with the patronage of
the Greek Embassy

Additional activities:
2007 present day Coordinator in Winter, Spring, Summer and
Autumn School of painting, tempera and watercolor,
organized by the Friends of Children of Belgrade, under the
auspices of the Belgrade City Assembly
2009 Author of the mural at the FDU (The Faculty of dramatic arts)
in Belgrade in the campaign called “Use your personality to
fight the violence” and the program entitled “The murals”
2010 Author of the mural at the station „Prokop“ in Belgrade,
organized by doc. Vesne Knezevic, under the sponsorship of the City.

Fine arts
24. 12. 2019
Mirjana Đošić

Illusions

Illusion stands for the deception of the senses, with an object being
observed differently than it seems to be in reality. Illusions involve
all senses, but most often they involve visual senses, namely, the eyes.
I use a mirror in my work, as well as the eyes as a certain kind
of mirror, to create my own space which does not necessarily have
to be a reflection of the real space that you think you are looking at.
My space represents a modern “mirror” which is related to the ar-
rangement in the picture of reality that we all carefully create about
ourselves on social networks. By subtle interventions within my art-
istic creativity, I tend to point out changes that happen to us in our
contemporary society and to our view of things. In my works, which
I perform using various techniques, I compose the scattered frag-
ments of everyday life. It is only at first sight these images radiate
with peace and silence, but at the same time they hide a certain in-
consistency that does not conform to our usual expectations.
I have been studying face, eyes and lips for quite some time now,
as well as the frozen moments that these faces represent in time and
space. I follow my own illusion by trying to present it as the truth. I
try to confound you, the observers, and to make you believe me.

The Phenomenon of Reflection as a Method of Own Artistic Research
In the course of my studies, the research I did was predominantly
related to self-portrait. In this case, I am using the word self-portrait
in a relative meaning as, in a way, it represents but does not necessar-
ily imply a self-(re)presentation of my image. The eyes see the world
around them, but at the same time create a personal impression of
that world, so they play a double role. Self-portrait mainly comes at
certain stages of life and can be the expression of ego showing us
our own imperfections. Precisely through the frame of the eye I have
tried to visualize my inner self, take a stand and ask questions to
myself and the world around me. I must admit that at the very be-
ginning I was not fully aware of the symbolism the eye in the form of
self-portrait could represent. Simply, one day, a look at my reflection
in the mirror made me think that precisely my own image was what
I wished to explore.
People face their mirror image every day – whether they like it or
not – and, looking at it, most of us feel like changing a thing or two
about our face or body, even if only a tiny detail, visible to no one but
ourselves. We are living in a world dominated by commercials that
keep telling us what we should actually look like. The faces and bodies
of people we see on TV look too perfect to be true. We are aware that
it is a kind of illusion created by the mass media and yet we comply.
To our complete frustration, we even struggle to live up to the surreal
bodies and faces gazing at us from screens and billboards. Of course,
this mission impossible creates a sort of uneasiness and very few end
up satisfied with what they see in the mirror. Unlike Narcissus 1) , we
are in no danger of falling in love with ourselves. The eye of God has
been substituted by the eye of the media, guiding us and shaping our
opinions and moral attitudes. Although I believe that beauty matters,
we apparently live in a society that not only mercilessly and inces-
santly promotes beauty, but also sets the unattainable standards of
beauty, forcing us either to fit the mold or die trying.
So, where does all that leave me as an artist? Perhaps my position
is somewhat superior as I, like a kind of plastic surgeon, feel free and
have the opportunity to change the face looking back at me from the
mirror. I also have the freedom to represent only the parts of my face
and body that I like best. Even to change them at will. I must admit
that I have rarely resorted to such tricks and mostly transferred the
truth to canvas. And yet, I did have a wish to make it likable. I believe
that it is intrinsic of art to please the eye, one way or another. An
image should trigger a kind of emotion with the viewer, I should say
– a positive emotion. Most artists today opt for provocation irrespec-
tive of whether their work provokes love or fear, hatred, repulsion
or no matter what, as long as there is a reaction from the audience.
Therefore, when I look in the mirror these days, I wonder what I am
actually looking for. How much of the things I have found would I
like to convey to the people and the world around me, or how I want
them to react. Is self-portrait a study of my personality or a kind of
fantasy? Indeed, the source of it all is nothing but love for oneself and
one’s image, the wish to be liked by others, too. Probably there is also
a bit of self-love, vanity and other, not highly positive qualities.
Maybe I was just trying to keep up with the times and show
myself in the most beautiful light possible. To match my own illusion
and hide the imperfections of which I was fully aware. That was how
it started; in the beginning I did not give much thought to whether
I wanted to achieve anything. It was enough for me to paint my own
image on canvas as true to life as possible and feel satisfied with the
result. To present beauty for beauty’s sake, to admire and let others
admire it.
__________________________
1) Narcissus was a hunter in Greek mythology, son of the river god Cephissus
and the nymph Liriope. He was a very beautiful young man who fell so
much in love with his image in the creek, that he died of desire for himself;
later on gods turned his body into a flower named after him; fig. a man in
love with himself, a beautiful young man.

Fine arts
24. 12. 2019
Jelena Vojvodić

The Phenomenon of Reflection as a Method of Own Art Research

Belgrade, in the course of my studies, the research I did was pre-
dominantly related to self-portrait. In this case, I am using the word
self-portrait in a relative meaning as, in a way, it represents but does
not necessarily imply a self-(re)presentation of my image. The eyes
see the world around them, but at the same time create a person-
al impression of that world, so they play a double role. Self-portrait
mainly comes at certain stages of life and can be the expression of
ego showing us our own imperfections. Precisely through the frame
of the eye I have tried to visualize my inner self, take a stand and ask
questions to myself and the world around me. I must admit that at
the very beginning I was not fully aware of the symbolism the eye
in the form of self-portrait could represent. Simply, one day, a look
at my reflection in the mirror made me think that precisely my own
image was what I wished to explore.
People face their mirror image every day – whether they like it or
not – and, looking at it, most of us feel like changing a thing or two
about our face or body, even if only a tiny detail, visible to no one but
ourselves. We are living in a world dominated by commercials that
keep telling us what we should actually look like. The faces and bodies
of people we see on TV look too perfect to be true. We are aware that
it is a kind of illusion created by the mass media and yet we comply.
To our complete frustration, we even struggle to live up to the surreal
bodies and faces gazing at us from screens and billboards. Of course,
this mission impossible creates a sort of uneasiness and very few end
up satisfied with what they see in the mirror. Unlike Narcissus 2) , we
are in no danger of falling in love with ourselves. The eye of God has
been substituted by the eye of the media, guiding us and shaping our
opinions and moral attitudes. Although I believe that beauty matters,
we apparently live in a society that not only mercilessly and inces-
santly promotes beauty, but also sets the unattainable standards of
beauty, forcing us either to fit the mold or die trying.
So, where does all that leave me as an artist? Perhaps my position
is somewhat superior as I, like a kind of plastic surgeon, feel free and
have the opportunity to change the face looking back at me from the
mirror. I also have the freedom to represent only the parts of my face
and body that I like best. Even to change them at will. I must admit
that I have rarely resorted to such tricks and mostly transferred the
truth to canvas. And yet, I did have a wish to make it likable. I believe
that it is intrinsic of art to please the eye, one way or another. An
image should trigger a kind of emotion with the viewer, I should say
– a positive emotion. Most artists today opt for provocation irrespec-
tive of whether their work provokes love or fear, hatred, repulsion
or no matter what, as long as there is a reaction from the audience.
Therefore, when I look in the mirror these days, I wonder what I am
actually looking for. How much of the things I have found would I
like to convey to the people and the world around me, or how I want
them to react. Is self-portrait a study of my personality or a kind of
fantasy? Indeed, the source of it all is nothing but love for oneself and
one’s image, the wish to be liked by others, too. Probably there is also
a bit of self-love, vanity and other, not highly positive qualities.
Maybe I was just trying to keep up with the times and show
myself in the most beautiful light possible. To match my own illusion
and hide the imperfections of which I was fully aware. That was how
it started; in the beginning I did not give much thought to whether
I wanted to achieve anything. It was enough for me to paint my own
image on canvas as true to life as possible and feel satisfied with the
result. To present beauty for beauty’s sake, to admire and let others
admire it.
Living at the turn of the 21st century, we are witnessing an exciting
and transformative period which has changed the entire human race,
a new era which is blurring the lines between the local and the global,
roots and mobility, work and free time, culture and a spectacle. These
changes are occurring as a direct result of new communication and
supervision systems, consumer society, globalization and its main
technological tool – Internet, which has, over the last 20 years, spun
its web over the entire planet, turning our eyes to the computer or
smartphone – in other words, to the screen and our own reflection in
it. Mirjana Đošić is an artist who uses subtle artistic touches to depict
the space in front of the screen and behind it, and various changes
occurring to all of us, changes in our views and experiences of living
in a community.
Her early works already featured certain motives and actions that
would later reappear in her work in various forms. This includes, in
particular, framing and magnifying of an eye/eyes, committed inter-
est in perspectives, (non)intermediate view, and optical reflection. In
her works – oil paintings, pastel paintings, collages or combinations
of all three of these techniques – she uses fragments of everyday life
and memories to make new compositions, creating new perspectives,
drawing images that emanate peace and quietude while at the same
time hiding something inconsistent or “unnatural”– and thus play-
ing with our assumptions and expectations. In the first stage of her
work, she carefully chooses between the multitude of her own paint-
ings or those by other artists, which she is exposed to every day, and
which easily and quickly travel throughout the planet. She frames
and magnifies their details, creating the sense of long periods of time,
and providing the “time for reflection”, which we all seem to lack
nowadays, in this era of superficiality and commotion. She turns her
paintings into collages, adding fragments of newspapers and adver-
tisements, imbuing it with the physicality, words, colours and rules
of the “real” world. Most often, she places magnified sunglasses with
a reflecting glass surface at the centre of the composition, creating a
space for a verification of the realness of the environment, in which a
visual game is played with the viewer. The image seen in the glasses
is not always a true reflection of the environment, thus becoming a
special, hybrid reality, one that only appears to be natural, indicat-
ing that simulations and mirages are becoming more “real” than the
reality itself. As the artist herself states in an article, glasses are used
as a “replacement for eyes and for a mirror”, leaving room for inter-
pretation of the object as an allusion to the surface of the screen, the
window into the world of today, so ubiquitous that we sometimes rely
on it more than on our own senses and physicality. This new, modern
“mirror” can be found in the artist’s digital self-portraits – her play
on a self-portrait as a combination of a selfie and a staged personal
reflection – the frequently narcissistic and carefully edited collages of
images of ourselves that we create on social networks and online in
general. Perhaps most attuned to the time are those pictures where
the human eye may be glimpsed through the glasses – pictures indi-
cating the mature technological idea of intermediate view and visual
networking of human vision with the screen/interface.
Mirjana Đošić and other contemporary artists are still privil-
eged as viewers into the world, and, working in the medium, they
are likely to be more sensitive to optical and cognitive changes which
may go unnoticed by others. As creators of “another reality”- actions
directly affecting the reality, they are the best at noticing paradigms
shifts and directions of technological development, which increas-
ingly participates in our subjectivization.
_________________________
2) Narcissus was a hunter in Greek mythology, son of the river god Cephissus
and the nymph Liriope. He was a very beautiful young man who fell so
much in love with his image in the creek, that he died of desire for himself;
later on gods turned his body into a flower named after him; fig. a man in
love with himself, a beautiful young man.

Fine arts
24. 12. 2019
Maja Olić

Reflection of View

One of the most interesting interpretations of my work at the time
was written by an art historian Maja Olić, in the catalogue of the
exhibition “Refleksija pogleda” (Reflections of the View), held in Trs-
tenik (September 9 to October 6, 2010): “As a reaction to conceptual-
ism, in the second half of the 20th century, hyperrealism was born
from artistic research, asking many questions on the existence of art
and artist in the universe as the place of origin in the broadest sense.
It was questioned and condemned by many critics, who judged it to
be the “art of silent majority, art of exultation, acceptance and adu-
lation of symbols and myths of contemporary USA”, according to
Giorgio di Genova. Until recently, it was considered cold, trapped
in its technical perfection, allegedly representing a false reality more
real than the real one. But is this really true?
This artistic genre does not preclude spiritual communication,
as evidenced by the oeuvre that Mirjana Đošić has presented to the
public. At first glance, she reminds us of Chuck Close and his in-
terpretation of photography: “Many believe that only one painting
may be created on the basis of one photo. However, many different
paintings may be created on the basis of one photo, just like on the
basis of reality.” By magnifying the picture to larger-than-life size,
he questions the reality of the displayed portrait. Mirjana goes even
further in her exploration. She displays the entire visible reality as a
reflection of the apparent reality. Her precise, fine and exact model-
ization is just a mirror to all the emotional states of a young artist,
which help her to find her way on the road to discovery of the real-
ity around her, and the reality within herself. Similar to Velázquez’s
court portraits, where the artist’s self-portrait is hidden in the mirror
facing the model, her reflection appears in the mirror of someone’s
eye. If we believe that eyes are the windows to the soul, then every eye
is a place of meeting – a bridge where traditional and modern princi-
ples clash, without any prospect of either winning.
All of the above indicates that an interpretation of the artistic
experience of Mirjana’s oeuvre is a much more complex issue than
critics at the end of the last century believed. The technical artistry
is not what makes the picture interesting. Beneath all the perfection
lies a web of various experiences, whose importance goes beyond
the apparent reality, revealing a double door into a new manner of
speaking to oneself and others. The central place in it belongs to the
human, while the city lights are just a reflection on the sunglasses.”

Fine arts
24. 12. 2019
Vesna Knežević

Mima’s Cake

Take a photo, tear it apart and join the pieces together again – and
you will create a new picture with small white lines connecting or
separating the integral area, providing a new view of the scene, and
introducing a new meaning into the observed view. This simple at-
tempt to create new meanings through a variety of visual art practi-
ces typical of collage also includes associative capabilities of both the
creator and the consumer.
Miracles happen in collages, and instead of the real and the fam-
iliar, they open the door into another world. The background, which
only hints at all the opportunities it presents, provides proper recom-
mendations for the way to view the displayed situation, as a repeated
occurrence of the personal act through a personal experience of the
fragmented reality. The magic and the newly won freedom allow the
artist to embody the role of a wise man who shakes the world and,
playing with reality, achieves new goals.
And so we come to Mima and her fine and passionate playful-
ness with collages. With her long, slender fingers and sharp eye, she
travels through the realms of other people’s writings on life and all
the different forms of life, and then slowly and carefully cuts the im-
portant parts with her eyes, body and soul, and weaves them into a
whole. And lo and behold! A new life and new forms slowly emerge
in front of us.

Music
24. 12. 2019
Marija Andjic

Which music do you listen to?

Like some kind of magic, it passes through us without question and
our approval, tickles us inside and leaves a lasting mark in our souls.
So subtle and pleasant that we indulge her unreservedly. Even if we
wanted to, we would have no way of resisting her.
We perceive music not only through the sense of hearing, but
with the whole body. It goes beyond our control and awareness.
Music is made of vibrations that resonate with the vibration of our
cells. When we listen to music it adjusts the vibration of our body
to its frequency and the heart beats at the Rhythm of the music.
Depending on the combination of tones, their duration, frequency,
our body produces different hormones that cause different moods
and emotions. We have all heard of dopamine, serotonin and endor-
phins, whose secretion raises happiness levels. It is known that the
tones of the frequency 432 Hz and 528 Hz cause the secretion of these
hormones and have a beneficial effect on our mood.
Whether or not our body will increase the level of serotonin and
dopamine or some other substance depends not only on the music
itself. It also depends on our experience, our beliefs, our level of con-
sciousness, as well as refinement of our hearing, what we will hear
from the same music and what emotions it will trigger in us. One
tune that sounds cheerful to most people, can cause by other melan-
choly and sadness because in their memory it is associated with some
sad event. On the other hand, a composition written in moll, which
sounds sad, could cause someone to feel hope and joy. “The picture
is in the eye of the beholder”, so our perception of music depends a
lot on ourselves.
It is interesting, if we take a little look at what we listen to and
why, and even wonder how it affects us, to what feelings and actions
it brings us, we would learn a lot about ourselves. By getting to know
oneself, one gets clarity and awareness of who they are, what they
want, what their opportunities and potentials are, how to develop
and direct themselves towards the goals they want to achieve, as well
as where they are in relation to the people around them. Self-aware-
ness helps us to better understand and accept others, what enhances
our relationships with them.
It is therefore important to hear what we are listening to.
However, the music is not only made of tones. Music can be the
rustle of leaves and the breeze of wind in the fall days. The music is
also Goulash’s spinning that starts even before he leaps into my lap to
pet him. The music is also the croaking of a rooster, which wakes me
up at 5am just when I finally get a chance to take a rest in my village
and sleep longer… The music is even a screaming flock of crews simi-
lar to the one that flew over the small house next to the schoolyard in
Zmaj Jovina Street, home of the person I love immensely …
Music is the words we utter or listen to. The sets of letters and
words that we refer to each other, as well as to ourselves, that have
their own frequencies and incredible impact on our being.
How aware of this music are we? What do we say and what do we
choose to hear?
Do we listen to commercials that convince us that we need that
product? Do we listen to the mass media? Programs that serve us
“truths” in their way. Contents that look like entertainment, and that
are actually designed to distract from serious issues? Do we listen
to trash music that promotes cheap morals, expensive cars, pornog-
raphy and crime? Do we listen to a neighbor’s gossip and retelling of
events? Do we listen to friends who are not successful in their jobs
but advise us what to do with ours? Do we listen to parents who, for
fear and worry, advise us to take a path of less resistance and a path
without risk?
What kind of music do we nourish our ears with? With what do
we feed our souls?
Do we allow mass media and society to create our opinions or do
we question their words? Do we think about it? Do we check? Do we
ask ourselves, “Whose opinion is this?” … What do we think that
we need and what do we really need? Is it right what is being done in
our family for generations, what our society is doing, what everyone
around us is doing? Are we able to get out of those frameworks and
make a judgment on what is right, or do we by default take on the be-
haviors of our loved ones? Are we meeting somebody’s expectations
or are we doing what we love? Are we buying something because we
really like it or because it is modern? What do we incorporate in our-
selves? How do we shape ourselves and our lives? Or maybe we allow
others to shape them instead …?
Choose your music! Turn off the TVs! Don’t listen to brainwash-
ing programs! Choose the quality content on the Internet from
which you will learn something new and upgrade yourself. A quality
movie. Read the classics. Read a few lines of poetry. Learn at least the
basic words of a new language. Master the new skill … Don’t go out
for coffee with a gossip girl! Don’t be in the company of a colleague
who talks about the same nonsense every day! Rather be by yourself
and choose music that will enhance your mood, brighten that coffee
break. Choose the company of successful people from whom you
will learn how to be successful. Choose a company of people from
whom you will learn about successful relationships. Choose inter-
esting people with vision and ideas, they will enrich your life! Make
the most of your time! Don’t just let it pass. It will go too fast anyway.
Pay attention to what you say and what you listen to! What you
listen to is what you become.
Choose your music wisely!

Music
24. 12. 2019
Irina Pavlović

Rhythm as the essence of jazz culture

“Everything in the universe has a rhythm, everything dances.” 1)
Maya Angelou

Somehow, intuitively, people consider rhythm to be the source of life.
“The rhythm of the drums that echo through the centuries”, playing
a very important spiritual role, especially for the many African cul-
tures and civilizations. “They were ever present at birth, initiation,
marriage, death, etc., as well as appearing at times of recreation…”
“Africa is the king of rhythms” 2) and “…the continent of drums
and percussion. African peoples reached the pinnacle of achievement
in that sphere.” 3) In jazz music and culture, rhythm is truly the driv-
ing force, and one of the most essential aspects that arise from the
African cultural heritage.
Rhythm is a feeling, and we cannot notate a feeling. Students of
this music must absorb it through listening, and this is the only way
towards true understanding, because only through listening we can
absorb the rhythm, feeling, spirit, emotion, expression, all aspects
that actually define music as an art form.
“Whenever African people have settled, they have created a new
music which is based on African rhythms. There is a great West Afri-
can influence in Brazil, also very much in Cuba and in Puerto Rico.
Gospel music, spirituals – they’re all African.” 4) Exploring and learn-
ing the history of African-American people, their roots and influen-
ces, is of great importance for the preservation of their music trad-
itions that have not just survived slavery but became a real cultural
phenomenon.
Along with the development of jazz, rhythm was developing
rapidly, becoming more complex. After the swing era, which was
the era of dance music, rhythm became complicated for the listeners
and difficult to understanding. “Some jazz music is for dancing and
some is strictly for listening.” 5) Early jazz music has always been relat-
ed to dance. Dance is not just aesthetic, but also an important social
element of African-American culture. Dance and music are deeply
intertwined, and that connection between rhythm and dance is very
strong, yet what inspires people to dance is actually the rhythm.
“They’re not particular whether you’re playing a flat 5th or a ruptured
129 th as long as they can dance.” 6) In other words, it is not import-
ant which tone or melody you play, the rhythmic aspect is essential.
The spectrum of rhythms in jazz began to develop rapidly in the 40s,
under the influence of various Latin rhythms. For instance, rhythm
and dance are highly developed in Latin America, hence the Carib-
bean and Latin influences are very important elements of jazz cul-
ture. “Rhythmically speaking”, there is a great connection between jazz
and the enormous field we call Latin music: “…It is very important to
know about the history. People need to know where the rhythms came
from, our heritage. They need to know that the slaves were brought
from Africa, that the slaves were not just brought to New Orleans but
to the Caribbean and Brazil and to Peru, and that’s why all the connec-
tions exist, rhythmically speaking.” 7)
The sense of rhythm (polyrhythmic, syncopation), creativity, and
improvisation are definitely highly developed in the music of Afri-
can-Americans, whose contribution is invaluable. We should not
forget that beside rhythm, the expression and social aspects also play
key roles in every Afro-American music as well “…Music and dance
had key roles in ‘uncontaminated’ African society…” 8) . No matter if
we talk about jazz, blues, gospel or Latin music, this cultural treasure
that arise from the African cultural heritage, define and make this
music culture truly authentic and “soulful”, and can easily become
someone’s fascination.
One really old saying from the great philosopher, Plato, explains
a lot on the matter: “Music and rhythm find their way into the secret
places of the soul.” 9)
_________________________
1) Maya Angelou, www.goodreads.com
2) -Sonny Rollins
3) Walter Rodney, “How Europe Underdeveloped Africa”, 1973, p.53
4) Weston, Randy, “Notes and Tones”, Taylor, Arthur ,1993
5) Horace Silver, “The Art of Small Jazz Combo Playing”, p. 10, 1995
6) Dizzy Gillespie, http://www.azquotes.com/quote/527960
7) Ignacio Berroa, https://tedpanken.wordpress.com/tag/ignacio-berroa/
8) Walter Rodney, “How Europe Underdeveloped Africa”, 1973, p.53
9) Plato, http://www.azquotes.com/

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Уредништво

Мило Ломпар
главни и одговорни уредник
(Београд, Србија)

Радомир Батуран
уредник српске секције и дијаспоре
(Торонто, Канада)

Владимир Димитријевић
оперативни уредник за матичне земље
(Чачак, Србија)

Никол Марковић
уредник енглеске секције и секретар Уредништва
(Торонто, Канада)

Уредници рубрика

Александар Петровић
Београд, Србија

Небојша Радић
Кембриџ, Енглеска

Жељко Продановић
Окланд, Нови Зеланд

Џонатан Лок Харт
Торонто, Канада

Жељко Родић
Оквил, Канада

Милорад Преловић
Торонто, Канада

Никола Глигоревић
Торонто, Канада

Лектори

Душица Ивановић
Торонто

Сања Крстоношић
Торонто

Александра Крстовић
Торонто

Графички дизајн

Антоније Батуран
Лондон

Технички уредник

Радмило Вишњевац
Торонто

Издавач

Часопис "Људи говоре"
The Journal "People Say"

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